icine.org
 The Top 100 Scenes from The Wire  
170 Replies | 25244 Views |
Registered iciners do not see these ads. Please log in or register.
Post new thread   Reply to thread     Index > Television Page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
| Previous thread | Next thread
AUTHOR POST
chocolatebanana


Joined: Mar 07, 2010

View user's profile Send private message Add User to Ignore List

POSTPosted: Wed Jun 30, 2010 7:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

9. Brianna Confronts McNulty about D'Angelo


I was looking for somebody who cared about the kid. I mean, like I said, you were the one who made him take the years, right?"


Season 3, Episode 8: Moral Midgetry



One of the most emotionally charged scenes in the show, with a palpable feeling of tenseness and guilt, this is the culmination of McNulty's investigation into D'Angelo's death, where all the various factors converge in one climactic scene. While McNulty is so much about his own ego, about how proving how smart he is, there is still a part of him that wants justice to be served and wants things to be right. It's not necessarily that he cares so much about D'Angelo, but rather that D'Angelo gets justice.

Brianna Barksdale is not a good mother, but I can't help but feel for her in this situation, when she wonders why McNulty would go to Donette. But it is true, she did make him take the years. And it's as if Brianna has some sort of emotional epiphany, breaking down in tears of guilt, and shows with her facial expressions that she really is beginning to question the Barksdale enterprise. (Of course, she literally questions Stringer Bell and her brother Avon, but to little avail.)

This scene features some of the best writing and acting on the show. Hyatt's Brianna is one of the more complex and interesting female characters on the show and West's McNulty shows new sides of himself with this scene. But more than that, the writing feels both natural and smart at the same time. It is able to get across so many emotions--grief, guilt, care, frustration, anger, disbelief--with so few words. It is a short scene, consisting of little action except talking, but it reveals so many layers with a small number of words. What's even more amazing is to see the reverberating effects of events from prior seasons--D'Angelo's decision to turn and D'Angelo's death--becoming such a powerful and emotional source of conflict later in the series, a notion that comes to fruition with this very effective scene between Brianna Barksdale and Jimmy McNulty.
chocolatebanana


Joined: Mar 07, 2010

View user's profile Send private message Add User to Ignore List

POSTPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 12:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

8. Carver Visits Randy at the Hospital


"You gonna help, huh? You gonna look out for me? You gonna look out for me, Sergeant Carver? You mean it? You gonna look out for me? You promise? You got my back, huh?"


Season 4, Episode 12: That's Got His Own



There is such a stark contrast between Randy when we first meet him and Randy at this point. His home is burned, his foster mother burned, himself injured, and his trust is destroyed. He is unable to even accept Carver's hand on his shoulder, and he shrugs him off immediately. Perhaps the most striking thing is how much older Randy seems--he sounds older and looks older, but just gives off an entire atmosphere that's in complete opposite to the fun, carefree Randy we knew at the beginning of season four. It's quite a transformation, but done in an entirely believable and nuanced way. This is one of the most heartbreaking and perhaps the most haunting scenes in the show, and one of the most perfect--and saddest--endings to an episode.

As much as I feel for Randy, I also feel for Carver. He is somewhat to blame, at least partially, for handing Randy off without checking on him, but for the most part, I don't blame him. When he walks away, the actor gives a great performance: it's not too melodramatic, but more subtle and convincing.

After remaining silent, Randy bitterly yells at Carver, thoroughly convinced that he won't be able to "help" him. And he's right, look where the police's involvement has gotten him so far, through incompetence, systemic failure, and bad luck. This is the real gut-punch of the scene, and I can't fault Carver or Randy for what has happened. I see this scene as the culmination of Randy's series of tragic events, converging into one horrible mess with no one person to blame for what has become of him.
chocolatebanana


Joined: Mar 07, 2010

View user's profile Send private message Add User to Ignore List

POSTPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 1:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

7. D'Angelo Analyzes The Great Gatsby


"The past is always with us. Where we come from, what we go through, how we go through it; all this shit matters. Like at the end of the book, ya' know, boats and tides and all. It's like you can change up, right, you can say you're somebody new, you can give yourself a whole new story. But, what came first is who you really are and what happened before is what really happened. It don't matter that some fool say he different 'cause the things that make you different is what you really do, what you really go through. Like, ya' know, all those books in his library. He frontin' with all them books, but if you pull one down off the shelf, none of the pages have ever been opened. He got all them books, and he hasn't read nearly one of them. Gatsby, he was who he was, and he did what he did. And 'cause he wasn't willing to get real with the story, that shit caught up to him."


Season 2, Episode 6: All Prologue



First, I should probably mention that The Great Gatsby is probably my favorite book ever, so perhaps that has something to do with this ranking. But just inserting my favorite novel wouldn't get this scene such a high mention: it's the way it uses this famous story to illustrate a point and to reveal further character development. I never though about The Great Gatsby when viewing this series or thinking about D'Angelo's story, but once it was brought up it makes absolute sense. Just as D'Angelo analyzed the book, I want to analyze his analysis of it.

"The past is always with us. Where we come from, what we go through, how we go through it; all this shit matters."

This is applicable to so many characters in the show, with the focus on environment and early experiences. Wallace is as attached to Baltimore as Stringer his to his "gangster" ways. D'Angelo is unable to escape his past just like McNulty is unable to avoid self-destruction. And I could go on and on, but the main idea is that there are things within us all that are very hard--or even impossible--to change.

"Like at the end of the book, ya' know, boats and tides and all. It's like you can change up, right, you can say you're somebody new, you can give yourself a whole new story. But, what came first is who you really are and what happened before is what really happened."

This recalls D'Angelo's dinner with Donette, when he questions what the other patrons in the restaurant must think of him. D'Angelo feels uncomfortable because he is trying to give himself "a whole new story," but recognizes that "what came first is who [he] really" is. D'Angelo clings to his past in some ways despite his desperation to escape it, just like Gatsby. If each experience a person has becomes a part of who they are, it becomes harder and harder to escape the past as certain notions and experiences become rooted in your very being.

"It don't matter that some fool say he different 'cause the things that make you different is what you really do, what you really go through. Like, ya' know, all those books in his library. He frontin' with all them books, but if you pull one down off the shelf, none of the pages have ever been opened. He got all them books, and he hasn't read nearly one of them. Gatsby, he was who he was, and he did what he did. And 'cause he wasn't willing to get real with the story, that shit caught up to him."

The epigraph for this episode was "It don't matter that some fool say he different..." and perhaps this is the sentence that best captures the meaning of the scene. Simply stating or deciding to be different doesn't make it so, especially when one's experiences are so tied to the person's personality, beliefs, and decisions. Also, this whole scene really resonates with Stringer Bell's character, who is the one probably most like Gatsby. Stringer is attempting to rise in prosperity and social class, attempting to break out of his "gangster" past to become a businessman. But he was "frontin'" and "wasn't willing to get real with the story," so "that shit caught up to him." It's pretty amazing how well this description really fits Stringer Bell's character, but it still applies to many characters in the show, especially because The Great Gatsby is a novel one is able to relate to on so many levels. This scene showcases some of the best dialogue and features an inverted portrayal of an imprisoned drug dealer, one who is actually able to speak clearly and thoughtfully explain what he believes. It's refreshing to see a nuanced character analyze a classic book in a way that is able to bring out new meaning to the scene, character, and series as a whole.
chocolatebanana


Joined: Mar 07, 2010

View user's profile Send private message Add User to Ignore List

POSTPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 1:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

6. Omar Little and Brother Mouzone Kill Stringer Bell


"Well, it seems like I can't saying nothing to change y'all minds."


Season 3, Episode 11: Middle Ground



It's a fitting end to one of the best, if not the best, characters in the show. Stringer Bell, with two men pointing guns at him, still tries to offer ways to get out, still not understanding what drives others.

To his developer, Stringer acts stubborn and frustrated, even more angry after dealing with Clay Davis's rainmaking scheme. It is clear that he is unable to make it in the business world, as Avon rightly predicted. As soon as guns come blazing in, he runs away, but there is no exit to be found, much like his inner life: he can try to go gangster or try to be a businessman, but either way he is always clinging to his nature while attempting to break free from it, ultimately causing his demise.

This scene could have gone over the top, but it faithfully remains in character. Omar is still flashy and vengeful, Brother Mouzone is silent and determined, and Stringer is desperately searching for a way to escape tragedy. But of course he still fails to realize the motivations of his two killers, and even if he had, he realizes he is done for.

This scene contains one of my favorite shots in the entire series, when it shows the huge billboard of B&B Enterprises and then cuts to Stringer's dead body, with the billboard still in the background. It is the perfect image that is able to capture the complexities behind Stringer's death and the tragic demise of one of the best characters on television ever.
chocolatebanana


Joined: Mar 07, 2010

View user's profile Send private message Add User to Ignore List

POSTPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 1:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

5. Bubbles Speaks at a NA Meeting


"Ain't no shame in holdin' on to grief, as long as you make room for other things too."


Season 5, Episode 9: Late Editions



The show pulls off a tremendous feat in making you root for Bubbles, but by the end there is probably few characters you want to have a happy ending more than Bubbles. Knowing that he ends the series happily makes it so much easier to re-watch, because for each painful event he goes through, I know he goes out well. And he really is one of the only characters to have a truly happy ending. It may not be bliss from this point, but I smiled so largely when he finally went upstairs to eat with his sister.

This scene is certainly joyous, but also somewhat bittersweet for Bubbles' recollection of Sherrod's death. But ultimately this scene makes me insanely happy, more than perhaps anything else from the show. It is truly great writing (from the magnificent George Pelecanos) in a scene that feels inspiring yet naturalistic, smart but real. Bubbles' speech contains important aphorisms, but also recounts his own struggle in a gripping and compelling manner.

I cannot praise Andre Royo's performance of Bubbles enough, but he is especially spectacular in this scene. His facial expressions are able to convey a wide set of emotions (among them guilt and regret, sorrow and happiness) and his cadence in the speech is pitch perfect. So much of this scene working rests on Royo's shoulders, but he elevates the great material into something truly special. It's a scene that shows the side of The Wire that tremendously admires the human spirit, affirming that there is still something to be said for individual struggle. Bubble's journey remains one of the show's most important storylines, with this scene being the amazing highlight of Bubble's character arc.
Eärendil The Mariner
The Doctor


Joined: Jul 02, 2005
Located: T.A.R.D.I.S.

View user's profile Send private message Add User to Ignore List

POSTPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 6:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

"Well get on with it motherf...." Fresh

_________________
Wandering the empty road,
In twilight's silver shade,
Following the hidden paths
Alone and unafraid.
Let the sunlight free the heart,
Forever bound to roam,
And let the waking morning find
The weary traveller returning home.
amberlita


Joined: Jun 17, 2005

View user's profile Send private message Add User to Ignore List
Yahoo Messenger

POSTPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 10:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh man I've missed a lot. Can't possibly catch up.

Loved your write-up for Omar's death. I think you hit it on the head why he was such a crucial character despite many people's complaints that he was too magical to be in a show of such verisimilitude.

Great write-up for D'angelo and the Great Gasby as well. Thumbs Up Thumbs Up There are a couple of deaths that hit me way harder than I expected them to. One was D and the other Bodie. After killing Wallace in S1 I thought he was unredeemable. Then he is contrasted as an old soldier fighting the newer, fiercer, and downright evil regime. There had been so much despair in the season to that point that I absolutely lost it and cried for the next 45 minutes straight.

Thank goodness for moments like Bubbles' speech. If anyone deserved a happy ending in the cruel world of The Wire truth, it was Bubbles. Both that moment and the one Bunny shares with the governor at Namond's graduation (was it his graduation that closed out that storyline? i forget) was the perfect message of the Wire - that the system won't save you. You have to say fuck it and decide that the only victories are the ones we craft on our own through individual determination and a love for the people trapped in the cycle.

Eager to see what else rounds out the list.
chocolatebanana


Joined: Mar 07, 2010

View user's profile Send private message Add User to Ignore List

POSTPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 11:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for your comments guys! I should be done really soon.
DrunkenSuperman


Joined: Oct 02, 2006

View user's profile Send private message Add User to Ignore List

POSTPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 11:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Re: #8 - fuck Herc. Seriously.
chocolatebanana


Joined: Mar 07, 2010

View user's profile Send private message Add User to Ignore List

POSTPosted: Wed Jul 07, 2010 1:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

4. Stringer and Avon on the Rooftop


"We ain't gotta dream no more, man."


Season 3, Episode 11: Middle Ground



Dramatic irony, a dynamic relationship, two unique characters, great dialogue, and incredibly acting are just some of the forces that combine together and form one of the greatest scenes in the show.

Avon and Stringer have both sold each other out, but while the audiences know this, the two characters don't. Avon isn't so sly with asking Stringer when he has his meeting, but he still gets the information he wants, and at that point we really Stringer is as good as gone.

Avon and Stringer recall their childhood days, remembering when they were small criminals with big dreams. But their hearts aren't in it--it's all an act. Stringer laughs too hard, Avon speaks with falseness, and while it all rings false, it's sad because of that artificiality. But what's even greater is that Stringer wants even more than what they bargained for, he is looking for more, while Avon is more content to stay where they are. Stringer is a man who always wants to reach his ideal, trying to attain perfection, while Avon is much more willing to let things slide. But both men, however, are stubborn in their desires and unyielding to their partners in their quest. This makes it all the more ironic that Avon still wants to "dream" while Stringer doesn't. But truly, Avon is more accepting of his reality while Stringer is still dreaming.

This scene is drama at its best. Deception and betrayal counterpointed with false reminiscing and artificially friendly dialogue between the two characters create a sorrowful and wistful atmosphere that emotionally resonates. At the beginning of the show, these two characters were partners together, but now they are torn apart by circumstance and personality. So much of this scene's power comes from the two characters' inability to confront one another--they avoid confrontation, pretending to reflect upon the past when really both are looking towards their futures.
chocolatebanana


Joined: Mar 07, 2010

View user's profile Send private message Add User to Ignore List

POSTPosted: Wed Jul 07, 2010 2:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

3. Bunk Chides Omar


"Bullshit, boy. No victim? I just came from Tosha's people, remember? All this death, you don't think it ripples out? You don't even know what the fuck I'm talking about. I was a few years ahead of you at Edmondson, but I know you remember the neighborhood, how it was. We had some bad boys, for real. Wasn't about guns so much as knowing what to do with your hands. Those boys could really rack. My father had me on the straight, but like any young man, I wanted to be hard too, so I'd turn up at all the house parties where the tough boys hung. Shit, they knew I wasn't one of them. Them hard cases would come up to me and say, "Go home, schoolboy, you don't belong here." Didn't realize at the time what they were doing for me. As rough as that neighborhood could be, we had us a community. Nobody, no victim, who didn't matter. And now all we got is bodies, and predatory motherfuckers like you. And out where that girl fell, I saw kids acting like Omar, calling you by name, glorifying your ass. Makes me sick, motherfucker, how far we done fell."


Season 3, Episode 6: Homecoming



I love Omar as much as the next guy, but it was about time someone set him straight. It's easy to root for Omar, as he is so charismatic and plain awesome, but he's a criminal and completely amoral. Bunk is often the source of comedy, but he is someone that is always worth listening to when he speaks, whether it is to make one laugh, to inform, or to explain. Here, Bunk has his most powerful and most important moment, with the best acting Wendell Pierce does in the entire series.

Bunk and Jimmy always meet at train tracks, but at night, speaking with unintelligible mumbles. In this scene, Bunk meets Omar at a bench by the train, in clear daylight, talking with a booming, clear voice. One of the best shots is after Omar spits, Bunk looking back disgustingly on the obviously distraught Omar. At least Omar does have a conscience and does take into account Bunk's speech, but not enough to fend off his need for revenge.

While the central character of The Wire is undoubtedly Baltimore and the show is definitely sprawling in its focus on multiple institutions, we don't always witness how the "normal" citizen of Baltimore is effected. There are many times, yes, that we do see it (e.g. community meetings), but much of it can be easily inferred. But it is nice to hear a police character speak so passionately about the community.

What gives this scene heightened effect is the two characters involved. Omar and Bunk went to the same high school but came out on possibly the two most divergent paths ever. Omar is a character viewers love for his criminality, while Bunk is a character we love for his comedy and crackdown on criminals. I actually think one of the best relationships on the show is that of Bunk and Omar, two wildly different figures in which many thematic elements can be explored.

Bunk has never been more convincing or compelling then he is in this speech. I don't think it's heavy-handed at all, as Bunk is naturally angry at Omar for ruining his investigation and is plain fed up with the decay he sees in his city. But he's not a mouthpiece for Simon's anger, but still a passionate character speaking out of frustration that he truly believes in. He is sickened to see those kids play like Omar, to see these deaths, and to see the sheer rottenness that has taken over the city.

This scene is memorable because of Bunk's "community" speech, but it also features some nice cinematography and great acting. Like I said before, Omar's character is made more real by Michael K. William's fascinating performance, and Bunk's personality is made more complex by Pierce's commanding turn as the police detective. This scene is brilliant for its breathtaking performances, incredible dialogue, and powerful message.
chocolatebanana


Joined: Mar 07, 2010

View user's profile Send private message Add User to Ignore List

POSTPosted: Wed Jul 07, 2010 2:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

2. Bodie and Poot Kill Wallace


"You should have stayed down in the country, man."


Season 1, Episode 12: Cleaning Up



Before this scene, I knew I was watching a great and amazing show. I knew that. But this scene absolutely floored me. I don't know how to make it even more clear, but it remains one of the best scenes I have seen in anything ever. It put me in a phase, and I was just bemoaning about the loss of a fictional character for days. The show already had me sold and I was already in love, but this scene made me a fanatic. This scene is just so hard-hitting and powerful.

I do wish Wallace had stayed in the country, like Bodie told him he should have. But I don't blame Wallace for coming back. As I've discussed before, Baltimore is all he knows, so it's hart to argue with his decision to return. Do I blame Bodie and Poot for killing Wallace? Yes, to an extent. But I blame Stringer Bell much more. I thought I would hate Bodie and Poot for the rest of the series, but I actually got to liking Bodie and was somewhat happy to see Poot working at Foot Locker.

This scene is just so deeply emotional. But it is also technically brilliant. The use of dark imagery, the shots of the stairs, and the looks on Bodie's face are all magnificent. And Wallace is backed into a corner, and when killed, his blood his splattered across the walls. It's a striking image that will be seen again in the season finale and much later in the show when McNulty looks through old files, but it's an indelible portrait of a kid who didn't deserve to die.

And he is just a kid. Despite his criminal activity, he is just a young teenager. But he is so much more. He is also taking care of kids, and it hurts so much to re-watch this scene and see him talking to the kids who aren't there. Wallace is orphaned, except he is somewhat unofficially adopted by the Barksdale crew, with only them--and the kids he takes care of--to call family. The point is worth repeating: Wallace is just a kid.

Poot remains silent throughout much of the scene, but it is upon his urging that Bodie finally fires. Bodie was trying to reassure himself that Wallace is a man, but it is so obvious he isn't. Wallace is unintelligible and despite watching this scene so many times, I still have to decipher what he says. Wallace looks weak to Bodie, but to viewers he's just a kid who gets what he so clearly doesn't deserve.

It is Wallace's crying and Bodie's need to act tough that help make this scene so great. In addition, much of the scene's greatness must be attributed to Michael B. Jordan's superlative performance in the final minutes of Wallace's life. It is definitely a hard scene to play, but he elevates the already special material into being something even more special.

This scene is amazingly powerful and completely transformative. It is truly an unforgettable scene that has left an emotional impression on me that will never go away.
chocolatebanana


Joined: Mar 07, 2010

View user's profile Send private message Add User to Ignore List

POSTPosted: Wed Jul 07, 2010 4:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

1. Michael and Dukie's Goodbye


"You remember that one day summer past...?"


Season 5, Episode 9: Late Editions



I never would have thought that the two words "I don't" would be the most powerful phrase in the history of the screen. Extremely heartbreaking, unrelentingly tragic, and brilliantly acted and written, this is the best scene from The Wire.

First, Dukie expressed his resistance to leave, stating his desire to remain with Michael, but Michael quickly rejects his possibility. Perhaps the memory is brought up because he knows he is going to leave, but Dukie recalls an event viewers know all too well.



Dukie asks if Michael remembers "That one day summer past," but Michael is unable to recall it. Looking at the scene and how Tristan Wilds plays it, I have come to the conclusion that Michael truly does not remember.



He is searching for the memory of the day of the piss balloon attack and buying of ice cream, but despite his search, he is unable to recall it. Wilds' break in his voice as he declares "I don't" sells the scene and is heartbreaking. Michael so wants some--any--connection with his past, to his more carefree days, but Michael is incapably of even providing him that.



So Dukie leaves to leave with the junkies after a goodbye where both characters know they will never see each other again. After walking out, Dukie looks back to see if Michael is there, but he's gone and Dukie is all alone.



Recognizing his solitary state and realizing he has nowhere else to go, Dukie descends into hell, unable to keep the devil down in the whole. His fate may have been doomed from the start, but it's cemented here.

I find the fate of the living to be more resonant and more emotional then the fate of the dead. Perhaps it is the finality of death, but the kids' stories resonate with me so much because they continue living past their televised appearances. Randy continues to struggle in his group home, Dukie will live with the junkies, and Michael will live as a stick-up boy.

Dukie and Michael have always been one of my favorite relationships on the show. Michael wants to--and does--protect vulnerable Dukie, but not enough to save him (as he can only save his brother Bug). Dukie's holding onto a thread, and that thread is Michael, so when it's dropped it makes total sense that he would turn to drugs. (In fact, I find it perhaps even more surprising that he hadn't already.)

So, what makes this the greatest scene? Why is this scene superior?

Acting: I can't heap enough praise onto the kids introduced in season four (and for that matter, Wallace portrayed by Michael B. Jordan from season 1). At the end of the brilliant penultimate episode of season five, Tristan Wilds has to carry some heavy scenes: shooting Snoop, leaving Bug, and saying goodbye to Dukie. And he doesn't just rise to the occasion, but he surpasses it. This scene is often seen as Michael's, but Jermaine Crawford does a tremendous job in illustrating the wistfulness, sorrow, and pain that Dukie has.

Writing: The phrase, "You remember that one day summer past...?" is one of my favorite pieces of dialogue ever, one that perfectly recalls the past, childhood, and a time of innocence, counterpointed with the sadness and pain of the scene at hand. Of course, there is also, "I don't," which owes much of its emotional power to Wilds' acting.

Cinematography: No, this scene isn't necessarily the best in this department, but it's still really good. The shot of Dukie walking away recalls Michael going to meet Marlo (and looking over his shoulder at Dukie) and the shots into the junkie's living area foreshadows Dukie's unfortunate future.

Overall Significance and Emotional Resonance: Ultimately, this is what makes this scene the greatest in the show. I use the word culmination a lot, but in many ways, this scene does feel like the culmination of the kids' journey that started in season four. It's just, everything feels so real and final at this point, but not final enough that we can't imagine what the kids' futures will look like. It feels as if this scene takes everything The Wire has been saying about systemic failures, institutional dysfunction, and broken America and all these themes' effects on childhood, and places it into one scene that packs the biggest emotional punch in the entire series.

Without a doubt in my mind, this is the most tragic and heartbreaking scene in the show, leaving me in waterworks and sadness after witnessing it. The Wire is about the city of Baltimore, but also shows two kids, who lives get screwed up for no good reason, and carrying out their lives to logical, if unfortunate, ends.

The scene transcends television, surpasses brilliance, and exceeds heartbreak, making it the best scene from The Wire.
robin
unsuspecting bleeding heart


Joined: Jun 17, 2005

View user's profile Send private message Add User to Ignore List

POSTPosted: Wed Jul 07, 2010 10:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I suspect no one wants to be the one to put end punctuation on this excellent thread. You've created a wonderful way to look at the series and finished it so strongly that you've left me pretty much speechless. Your work here belongs on any list of icine's very best.

Penguin Worship

_________________
icine has a Supernatural blog
Quite-Gone Genie


Joined: Dec 28, 2005
Located: 36°10'30"N, 115°08'11"W

View user's profile Send private message Add User to Ignore List
Send e-mail AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger

POSTPosted: Wed Jul 07, 2010 11:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I applaud the depth of your writing. Great thread.

_________________
chocolatebanana


Joined: Mar 07, 2010

View user's profile Send private message Add User to Ignore List

POSTPosted: Thu Jul 08, 2010 12:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

robin wrote:
I suspect no one wants to be the one to put end punctuation on this excellent thread. You've created a wonderful way to look at the series and finished it so strongly that you've left me pretty much speechless. Your work here belongs on any list of icine's very best.

Penguin Worship


Wow, I really don't think I deserve that praise, but everyone who worked on the show certainly does.

Thanks though!! Very Happy
chocolatebanana


Joined: Mar 07, 2010

View user's profile Send private message Add User to Ignore List

POSTPosted: Thu Jul 08, 2010 12:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quite-Gone Genie wrote:
I applaud the depth of your writing. Great thread.


Thank you very much.
Peppe


Joined: Jul 21, 2010
Located: Republic of Jämtland

View user's profile Send private message Add User to Ignore List

POSTPosted: Wed Jul 21, 2010 3:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For my very first post here I'd like to say that this is one hell of a thread.


and you're chocolatebanana from the imdb-boards, right? Nice seeing you here Smile

_________________
Taking notes on a criminal conspiracy
robin
unsuspecting bleeding heart


Joined: Jun 17, 2005

View user's profile Send private message Add User to Ignore List

POSTPosted: Wed Jul 21, 2010 4:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Peppe wrote:
For my very first post here I'd like to say that this is one hell of a thread.


and you're chocolatebanana from the imdb-boards, right? Nice seeing you here Smile

Welcome! Peppe, you picked a great thread to say hello in!

I believe CB is internetless for a few days, so don't worry if he doesn't notice your post right away.

_________________
icine has a Supernatural blog
chocolatebanana


Joined: Mar 07, 2010

View user's profile Send private message Add User to Ignore List

POSTPosted: Wed Aug 11, 2010 9:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Peppe wrote:
For my very first post here I'd like to say that this is one hell of a thread.


and you're chocolatebanana from the imdb-boards, right? Nice seeing you here Smile


As robin said, I was away (for a month).

Thank you and yup, that's me. Icine >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> IMDB though.
chocolatebanana


Joined: Mar 07, 2010

View user's profile Send private message Add User to Ignore List

POSTPosted: Wed Aug 11, 2010 10:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Number of Scenes in Each Season
Season 1: 21
Season 2: 14
Season 3: 21
Season 4: 20
Season 5: 24

This does not mean season 5 is my favorite season; in fact, it is my least favorite. One big thing to point out, is that NO newspaper scenes are in the top 100, because I don't think that storyline has any scenes deserving of it (unless you count McNulty talking to Templeton). My guess is that season 5 has so many scenes because it is the last time we see so many characters and storylines. In addition, the last episodes remained embedded in my mind, because, you know, it's the end. Season 4 is actually my favorite, and it's has about the same number of scenes and seasons 1 and 3. Season 2 is probably lower down, because it's my second-to-last and because its perhaps the biggest in terms of a build-up.

Episodes with The Most Scenes
1t. Season 4, Episode 13: Final Grades (7)
1t. Season 5, Episode 10: -30- (7)
3t. Season 3, Episode 11: Middle Ground (5)
3t. Season 2, Episode 6: All Prologue (5)
5t. Season 5, Episode 9: Late Editions (4)
5t. Season 4, Episode 12: That's Got His Own (4)
5t. Season 2, Episode 11: Bad Dreams (4)
5t. Season 1, Episode 13: Sentencing (4)
5t. Season 1, Episode 3: The Buys (4)
10t. Season 1, Episode 12: Cleaning Up (3)
10t. Season 3, Episode 6: Homecoming (3)
10t. Season 4, Episode 1: Boys of Summer (3)
10t. Season 5, Episode 4: Transitions (3)
10t. Season 5, Episode 8: Clarifications (3)

So, it was The Buys (Season 1, Episode 3) that hooked me into the show. Obviously, this skews towards later episodes, so All Prologue is notable for being probably the best mid-season episode to date (D'Angelo's Gatsby speech and death, Omar in court). The last three episodes of season 5 are on there, solidifying my opinion that season 5 is amazing with its final episodes. My favorite episode may be Final Grades, but Cleaning Up, All Prologue, Bad Dreams, Middle Ground, Late Editions, and -30- are all up there as well.

So, there it is. This thread was fun to do. Very Happy
Post new thread   Reply to thread     Index > Television Page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
 








icine.org © 2003-2012. Forums powered by phpBB.